#316 My ideas regarding www.codeberg.eu site

Open
opened 1 month ago by ojn · 3 comments
ojn commented 1 month ago

This is inspired from responses in #303

I do think that "running it in parallel to .page, and let the user choose what URL to give out" is a great usage for this domain name.

Regarding the main site www.codeberg.eu my suggestion is to use the site as aggregator for general FOSS information, think many Creative Commons texts (including some great books on the subject). Assembling the different knowledge from CC and GFDL texts in one place, like codeberg docs just broader.

Since Codeberg e.V is "gemeinnütziger Verein" even text with CC non-commercial can be included, adopted and expanded.

This type of knowledge base if done in formal and friendly way can be a gateway for new contributors.

What I'm suggesting is not a second arch-wiki but a curated general information site for anyone curious of what FOSS is about.

Books that I'd say worth basing this on are:

-Producing Open Source Software by Karl Fogel
-Ten Steps for Linux Survival by Jim Lehmer
-Two Bits, the Cultural Significans of Free Software by Christopher M. Kelty

and https://copyleft.org/guide/

For general topics texts like SUSE GNOME guide and Debian Handbook could also provide guidance on where to read about those things.

There are much more books, tutorial and blogs and writings online with suitable licenses to be adopted from.

Essentially we need a distillery of usefull FOSS information!
I'm suggesting www.codeberg.eu to be that.

Even books like https://assets.digitalocean.com/books/how-to-code-in-go.pdf can be good for some parts of the site when Go is talked about.

There are some books on FOSS that are great but has become outdated so they provide good scaffolding for the topics and ability for improvements and factual updates.

I don't think that dumping a bunch of text is a good idea, there needs to be some editorial oversight.

Arguing about if it should be FOSS or FLOSS is bikeshedding.

About the software, I know that static site generators are the what all the cool kids are using so I would suggest mdBook.

It has the ability to reuse parts of the text of one page in another (using // ANCHOR: comments magic word) the so called includes. This is important if separate parts would be referenced to different original texts (to give a proper credit).

https://rust-lang.github.io/mdBook/format/mdbook.html#including-portions-of-a-file

edit: forgot to mention https://linuxjourney.com/ brilliant CC-BY-SA website but is somewhat outdated now. I'm sure there are a bunch more like that.

This is inspired from responses in https://codeberg.org/Codeberg/Community/issues/303 I do think that "running it in parallel to .page, and let the user choose what URL to give out" is a great usage for this domain name. Regarding the main site www.codeberg.eu my suggestion is to use the site as aggregator for general FOSS information, think many Creative Commons texts (including some great books on the subject). Assembling the different knowledge from CC and GFDL texts in one place, like codeberg docs just broader. Since Codeberg e.V is "gemeinnütziger Verein" even text with CC non-commercial can be included, adopted and expanded. This type of knowledge base if done in formal and friendly way can be a gateway for new contributors. What I'm suggesting is not a second arch-wiki but a curated general information site for anyone curious of what FOSS is about. Books that I'd say worth basing this on are: -Producing Open Source Software by Karl Fogel -Ten Steps for Linux Survival by Jim Lehmer -Two Bits, the Cultural Significans of Free Software by Christopher M. Kelty and https://copyleft.org/guide/ For general topics texts like SUSE GNOME guide and Debian Handbook could also provide guidance on where to read about those things. There are much more books, tutorial and blogs and writings online with suitable licenses to be adopted from. Essentially we need a distillery of usefull FOSS information! I'm suggesting www.codeberg.eu to be that. Even books like https://assets.digitalocean.com/books/how-to-code-in-go.pdf can be good for some parts of the site when Go is talked about. There are some books on FOSS that are great but has become outdated so they provide good scaffolding for the topics and ability for improvements and factual updates. I don't think that dumping a bunch of text is a good idea, there needs to be some editorial oversight. Arguing about if it should be FOSS or FLOSS is bikeshedding. About the software, I know that static site generators are the what all the cool kids are using so I would suggest mdBook. It has the ability to reuse parts of the text of one page in another (using // ANCHOR: comments magic word) the so called includes. This is important if separate parts would be referenced to different original texts (to give a proper credit). https://rust-lang.github.io/mdBook/format/mdbook.html#including-portions-of-a-file edit: forgot to mention https://linuxjourney.com/ brilliant CC-BY-SA website but is somewhat outdated now. I'm sure there are a bunch more like that.
ojn commented 1 month ago
Poster

Another awesome resource
https://software-carpentry.org/lessons/previous/
seldom updated now

Actually thinking a bit more about it,
even hosting this kind of site on guide.codeberg.eu org guide.codeberg.org would be okay, but finding a sufficiently cathy name is hard though. Maybe calling it The Codeberg's Guide to Computing or something, just that is sounds more awesome.

Another awesome resource https://software-carpentry.org/lessons/previous/ seldom updated now Actually thinking a bit more about it, even hosting this kind of site on guide.codeberg.eu org guide.codeberg.org would be okay, but finding a sufficiently cathy name is hard though. Maybe calling it **The Codeberg's Guide to Computing** or something, just that is sounds more awesome.
Poster

Somewhat related, just FYI: I started the delightful project on Codeberg some time ago. It is like awesome on GH, but only for FOSS, Open Science and Open Data related curated lists.

https://codeberg.org/teaserbot-labs/delightful

Somewhat related, just FYI: I started the **delightful** project on Codeberg some time ago. It is like awesome on GH, but only for FOSS, Open Science and Open Data related curated lists. https://codeberg.org/teaserbot-labs/delightful
ojn commented 1 month ago
Poster

@circlebuilder there's also this https://codeberg.org/swiso/website
and https://codeberg.org/LinuxCafeFederation/awesome-alternatives and sure bunch of other good lists

What I been imagining is something like https://opensource.guide/ but much better (I will spare my critique for now). That sort of effort would probably need a disclaimer from Codeberg e.V, that the texts are already licensed with CC or GFDL or else have been written by contributor themselves and assigned the correct license (and that contributors are personally responsible for the correct attribution etc).

Of course it's better from the SEO point of view to stick with original text (nothing stops us for the possibility of being inspired though).

What would actually be super usefull is if such guide could be multiligual with translations (this goal would clearly keep the size from blowing out of proportions) but it could be difficult to decide on the translations of terminology.

Using the same writing style beforehand would also be good.
What I'm wondering for this potential guide, what sort of scope would it need to have, what would be the target audience? Beginners, enthusiasts and developers - that's a separation into 3 groups allready. If one tailors just the introduction to be comprehensible by newbies, the part for enthusiast and developer can gradually be more involved. It's really not to too wise spliting a document in parts depending on the reader group (sometimes the reader isn't aware of their knowledge or underestimates it).


For anyone reading this, off course what's important now is to finish https://codeberg.org/Codeberg/Documentation it need to be in good shape first and foremost.

@circlebuilder there's also this https://codeberg.org/swiso/website and https://codeberg.org/LinuxCafeFederation/awesome-alternatives and sure bunch of other good lists What I been imagining is something like https://opensource.guide/ but much better (I will spare my critique for now). That sort of effort would probably need a disclaimer from Codeberg e.V, that the texts are already licensed with CC or GFDL or else have been written by contributor themselves and assigned the correct license (and that contributors are personally responsible for the correct attribution etc). Of course it's better from the SEO point of view to stick with original text (nothing stops us for the possibility of being inspired though). What would actually be super usefull is if such guide could be multiligual with translations (this goal would clearly keep the size from blowing out of proportions) but it could be difficult to decide on the translations of terminology. Using the same writing style beforehand would also be good. What I'm wondering for this potential guide, what sort of scope would it need to have, what would be the target audience? Beginners, enthusiasts and developers - that's a separation into 3 groups allready. If one tailors just the introduction to be comprehensible by newbies, the part for enthusiast and developer can gradually be more involved. It's really not to too wise spliting a document in parts depending on the reader group (sometimes the reader isn't aware of their knowledge or underestimates it). ----- For anyone reading this, off course what's important now is to finish https://codeberg.org/Codeberg/Documentation it need to be in good shape first and foremost.
Sign in to join this conversation.
No Milestone
No Assignees
2 Participants
Notifications
Due Date

No due date set.

Dependencies

This issue currently doesn't have any dependencies.

Loading…
There is no content yet.