#200 "Community spotlight" for the blog

Open
opened 10 months ago by steko · 12 comments
steko commented 10 months ago

Hi,
since there are many projects on Codeberg it would be useful to publish a regular (e.g. monthly?) "community spotlight" with a short text interview to developers of popular or interesting or .. regular software, to give some visibility and encourage a stronger participation.

I know that making this proposal without volunteering to actually do the interview and writeup is rather silly, but before that I wanted to see what others think and if there's enough interest.

Hi, since there are many projects on Codeberg it would be useful to publish a regular (e.g. monthly?) "community spotlight" with a short text interview to developers of popular or interesting or .. regular software, to give some visibility and encourage a stronger participation. I know that making this proposal without volunteering to actually do the interview and writeup is rather silly, but before that I wanted to see what others think and if there's enough interest.
hw commented 10 months ago
Owner

I like it.

I like it.
steko commented 9 months ago
Poster

I see this proposal has some support, fantastic!

Perhaps for the time being the best thing is to keep track of the proposed blog posts here.

There seem to be two ways to "measure" popularity of repositories: stars ("favorites") and forks. For both criteria the most popular repository is Gadgetbridge. So it would seem appropriate to start with the most popular repository for the first blog post.

I see this proposal has some support, fantastic! Perhaps for the time being the best thing is to keep track of the proposed blog posts here. There seem to be two ways to "measure" popularity of repositories: stars ("favorites") and forks. For both criteria the most popular repository is [Gadgetbridge](https://codeberg.org/Freeyourgadget/Gadgetbridge). So it would seem appropriate to start with the most popular repository for the first blog post.
fnetX commented 9 months ago
Collaborator

Another indicator is having a look at the activity tab and counting recent commits, PRs, Issues, amount of code lines changed etc ...

We could either set up some collaborative docs (Etherpad or CodiMD) to start writing the blog posts ... or start a rotating model - like discuss the editorial things here and someone assigns him or herself for the next spotlight, next months someone else etc ...

I'd love to help on that.

Another indicator is having a look at the activity tab and counting recent commits, PRs, Issues, amount of code lines changed etc ... We could either set up some collaborative docs (Etherpad or CodiMD) to start writing the blog posts ... or start a rotating model - like discuss the editorial things here and someone assigns him or herself for the next spotlight, next months someone else etc ... I'd love to help on that.
steko commented 9 months ago
Poster

@fnetX that's great!

My suggestion is to create one issue for each blog post, possibly at https://codeberg.org/Codeberg/blog/issues so we can keep track and submit pull requests with the content before it's published. Each issue could link to an Etherpad, be assigned to someone etc.

@hw does that look OK?

@fnetX that's great! My suggestion is to create one issue for each blog post, possibly at https://codeberg.org/Codeberg/blog/issues so we can keep track and submit pull requests with the content before it's published. Each issue could link to an Etherpad, be assigned to someone etc. @hw does that look OK?
hw commented 9 months ago
Owner

Just create a PR for https://codeberg.org/Codeberg/blog (simply a new markdown file in the content folder), as soon the merge button is pressed, the blog post gets published.

Just create a PR for https://codeberg.org/Codeberg/blog (simply a new markdown file in the content folder), as soon the merge button is pressed, the blog post gets published.
fnetX commented 9 months ago
Collaborator

I just wanted to create issues and correspondig CodiMD docs for the currently most starred // forked repos which are FitoTrack and Gadgetbridge¹ but realized we don't really have a concept on how to reach out for the main developers, not even on how to determine who they are.

@jannis @ashimokawa Do you have any idea on how to get in contact?

The most common approach would be to establish some editorial, create a spotlight@codeberg.org mail address and reach out to the users via email. But I'm concerned about mail privacy (codeberg could establish the connection and ask if they're okay with getting featured, asking them to reach out to this address) and of course about how to chose this time. I'm really inspired on how community-driven stuff works at the moment and it would be best to simply start writing on the stuff.


So the only thing that came to my mind was some introduction of the community spotlight in the first post which is not useful when there are some more open questions ...

I had some ideas about how to organize the blog, I'll open an issue there.

[1] I also considered some formula to calculate the head of some repo with amount of forks times amount of stars and taking the amount of recent work into consideration ... nothing for the MVP, but we could also think about that ...

I just wanted to create issues and correspondig CodiMD docs for the currently most starred // forked repos which are FitoTrack and Gadgetbridge¹ but realized we don't really have a concept on how to reach out for the main developers, not even on how to determine who they are. @jannis @ashimokawa Do you have any idea on how to get in contact? The most common approach would be to establish some editorial, create a spotlight@codeberg.org mail address and reach out to the users via email. But I'm concerned about mail privacy (codeberg could establish the connection and ask if they're okay with getting featured, asking them to reach out to this address) and of course about how to chose this time. I'm really inspired on how community-driven stuff works at the moment and it would be best to simply start writing on the stuff. --- So the only thing that came to my mind was some introduction of the community spotlight in the first post which is not useful when there are some more open questions ... I had some ideas about how to organize the blog, I'll open an issue there. [1] I also considered some formula to calculate the head of some repo with amount of forks times amount of stars and taking the amount of recent work into consideration ... nothing for the MVP, but we could also think about that ...
hw commented 9 months ago
Owner

@jannis @ashimokawa Do you have any idea on how to get in contact?

The most common approach would be to establish some editorial, create a spotlight@codeberg.org mail address and reach out to the users via email. But I'm concerned about mail privacy

You can always contact the maintainers in the project issue tracker, this should not have any privacy issues?

> > @jannis @ashimokawa Do you have any idea on how to get in contact? > > The most common approach would be to establish some editorial, create a spotlight@codeberg.org mail address and reach out to the users via email. But I'm concerned about mail privacy You can always contact the maintainers in the project issue tracker, this should not have any privacy issues?
fnetX commented 3 months ago
Collaborator

Hey there, I finally wrote my first Community Spotlight and I want to share some experiences:

  1. Damn, that was more effort than I wanted to put into this. I'm unsure whether I want to stick to the quality or establish a routine which might drop the former

  2. I decided against presenting the highlights of Codeberg. Apart from the fact that it would have been more complex, as I initially planned some true calculations for the spotlight selection, I don't think it's necessary to present those. I think most users who are interested in other's work already checked out the projects with the most stars, the most forks etc ... I think the top projects on Codeberg are well known.

    1. I also think that this format can only survive, if I and hopefully others have the motivation to write about something. Personally it was so much easier to find some fascination in putting "something" from the timeline into the Codeberg spotlight which really interests me.

    2. And obviously there's not enough capacity right now to establish an editorial, this issue was stale for months. So it's probably better to count on the community contributions and encourage them with the flexibility to write about "whatever they want".

  3. I hope to invite others. Checking out a project is fun. But diving into one and writing about the journey, reaching out the maintainer, learning about its history ... well, it's a different thing. Try it out!

Whatever, I think I'll play a little with the format, I have some more ideas I'd like to try. I'd love to see others do the same as I can only cover a subset of cool repos since there is much I won't be interested in or can't check out because I lack required hardware etc ...

Hey there, I finally wrote my first Community Spotlight and I want to share some experiences: 1. Damn, that was more effort than I wanted to put into this. I'm unsure whether I want to stick to the quality or establish a routine which might drop the former 2. I decided against presenting the highlights of Codeberg. Apart from the fact that it would have been more complex, as I initially planned some true calculations for the spotlight selection, I don't think it's necessary to present those. I think most users who are interested in other's work already checked out the projects with the most stars, the most forks etc ... I think the top projects on Codeberg are well known. 1. I also think that this format can only survive, if I and hopefully others have the motivation to write about something. Personally it was so much easier to find some fascination in putting "something" from the timeline into the Codeberg spotlight which really interests me. 2. And obviously there's not enough capacity right now to establish an editorial, this issue was stale for months. So it's probably better to count on the community contributions and encourage them with the flexibility to write about "whatever they want". 3. I hope to invite others. Checking out a project is fun. But diving into one and writing about the journey, reaching out the maintainer, learning about its history ... well, it's a different thing. Try it out! Whatever, I think I'll play a little with the format, I have some more ideas I'd like to try. I'd love to see others do the same as I can only cover a subset of cool repos since there is much I won't be interested in or can't check out because I lack required hardware etc ...
hw commented 3 months ago
Owner

Maybe it is best to start with some little things? Every little feature can deserve a short post, a contribution is as simple as a PR to https://codeberg.org/codeberg/blog

Maybe it is best to start with some little things? Every little feature can deserve a short post, a contribution is as simple as a PR to https://codeberg.org/codeberg/blog
hw commented 3 months ago
Owner

(PR just adds a markdown file to contents/ folder)

(PR just adds a markdown file to `contents/` folder)
fnetX added the
public relations
label 1 month ago
davidak commented 3 weeks ago
Collaborator

I think most users who are interested in other's work already checked out the projects with the most stars, the most forks etc ... I think the top projects on Codeberg are well known.

Maybe, but maybe not. Also, the blog is a general resource on the internet that could be interesting to more people, especially when we publish interesting stuff about free software in general. Also, when we share blog articles on Mastodon, more people might find them, for example when followers (probably users?) boost (share) them.

So, i would encourage you to continue the work.

We can also ask if projects want to get featured. (for example in the posts itself)

Why not create a shared document to collect a list of interesting projects. Then people can pick one to write about.

>I think most users who are interested in other's work already checked out the projects with the most stars, the most forks etc ... I think the top projects on Codeberg are well known. Maybe, but maybe not. Also, the blog is a general resource on the internet that could be interesting to more people, especially when we publish interesting stuff about free software in general. Also, when we share blog articles on Mastodon, more people might find them, for example when followers (probably users?) boost (share) them. So, i would encourage you to continue the work. We can also ask if projects want to get featured. (for example in the posts itself) Why not create a shared document to collect a list of interesting projects. Then people can pick one to write about.
fnetX commented 3 weeks ago
Collaborator

I already started working on some pieces, but it's not yet enough to merge them into a really article. Since this is open, I encourage everyone to present some projects until I find the time to get this done.

The first Community Spotlight was shared on Mastodon.

I personally don't think that a list of interesting projects is a good idea, people should look for themselves what they find interesting imho. I mean, I don't have objections, but I won't create one.

I totally agree to the point that the blog is also a point for showing off, so introducing the big projects there is a nice idea.

I already started working on some pieces, but it's not yet enough to merge them into a really article. Since this is open, I encourage everyone to present some projects until I find the time to get this done. The first Community Spotlight was shared on Mastodon. I personally don't think that a list of interesting projects is a good idea, people should look for themselves what they find interesting imho. I mean, I don't have objections, but I won't create one. I totally agree to the point that the blog is also a point for showing off, so introducing the big projects there is a nice idea.
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